Patiently selling crabs

Making a Living

After difficulties with farming made it unprofitable, Bharrat (only name given) and his friend Desmond Sookram decided to become crab vendors in order to make a living.

The two men who are in their fifties sell on the Rupert Craig Highway in the vicinity of Ogle, where they have crabs of all sizes on sale daily. With the live crustaceans stored in containers, they sit by the roadside and patiently wait for interested persons to stop.

Bharrat, the more vocal of two, related that he used to plant calaloo, pak choy and other vegetables at his home but the rain would usually ruin his efforts. With his effort to provide for his family being thwarted, he knew he had to find another way of earning an income. “I used to love farming but when the rain fall it does hambug the crops… they does dead out,” he said.

He knew of a man from Corentyne who would usually sell crabs to persons in Georgetown, and entered into an agreement with him. The crabs, which Bharrat and Sookram sell, journey to the city by car from Canje where they are caught by residents, who in turn sell them to Bharrat’s agent.
“Some day it rough, some day it good,” he said while indicating that his best customers are foreigners. Depending on the size, one can get six big crabs or ten small one for $1,000.

Desmond Sookram and Bharrat patiently waiting for their next sale.

“It’s a reasonable job,” Bharrat declares, his only problem being that it is seasonal. In the off-season, he plans to try his best with farming, though he lacks much optimism about it. “With this at least you can earn something daily but with farming all your work can go down the drain quickly,” he explains.

The men begin their business day at 6 am and stay until 4 pm. The difficulty obtaining transportation to journey to Coldingen where Bharrat lives, forces them to leave early. At the end of the day, they pick out the dead crabs and dispose of them. The rest of the live crustaceans are stored for the next day. “You does carry nuff losses, but there are days when you can make up to $15,000.”

Desmond Sookram puts a string of crabs back into the barrel.

It is literally ‘crabs in a barrel’ as the crustaceans move about; they are occasionally soaked with water to ensure that the sun does not dry them out. Under the shade of a huge tree, Bharrat and Desmond sit on an old fridge keeping each other’s company as they wait for the next vehicle to stop. (Candace Phillips)

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Peru’s president-elect demands freedoms in Venezuela

Peru’s pro-business President-elect Pedro Pablo Kuczynski won his country’s elections by a hair with the last-minute help of a leftist party, but — judging from what he told me in an interview — he won’t budge on his criticism of Venezuela and other repressive regimes.

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Public financial management: 1966 – present (Final)

This is the fifth and final in a series of articles on the above aimed at highlighting the extent of our achievements in the post-Independence period.

LUCAS STOCK INDEXThe Lucas Stock Index (LSI) rose 0.54 per cent during the third period of trading in June 2016. The stocks of six companies were traded with 79,573 shares changing hands. There were three Climbers and one Tumbler. The stocks of Banks DIH (DIH) rose 1.98 per cent on the sale of 18,757 while the stocks of Demerara Distillers Limited (DDL) rose 5.26 per cent on the sale of 41,667 shares. In addition, the stocks of Demerara Tobacco Company (DTC) rose 1.51 per cent on the sale of 13,603 shares. In contrast, the stocks of Demerara Bank Limited (DBL) fell 5.26 per cent on the sale of 4,324 shares.  In the meanwhile, the stocks of Guyana Bank for Trade and Industry (BTI) and Republic Bank Limited (RBL) remained unchanged on the sale of 222 and 1,000 shares respectively.

Massy and Guyana (Part 1)

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Value-added performance of the forest sub-sector: Erratic, weak, declining

Erratic Last week’s column highlighted what I consider to be a most distinctive feature of the extractive forest sub-sector’s performance in Guyana’s economy, during the past decade.

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The UK bids Europe farewell

On June 23 by a small majority, the British people voted to remove themselves from the European Union (EU). The decision has consequences for the Caribbean.

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What would life be without sport?

I wonder what it would be like to exclude sport completely from one’s life for, say, one year? No playing sport, no watching it, no reading it no discussing it no thinking about it even.

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Brexit: Lessons for Caricom

The results of the referendum held in Britain to determine whether or not it should remain in or leave the European Union (EU), has been won by voters who supported the leave option.

Director of Sport Christopher Jones and President of the Guyana Chess Federation Irshad Mohammed (centre) stand with some members of the 2016 Guyana Olympiad chess team. The team travels to Baku, Azerbaijan, for participation at the Olympiad in September. A signature qualifying tournament was not held to determine the members of Guyana’s Olympiad chess team.

Federation picks chess Olympiad team without holding qualifier

The Guyana Chess Federation (GCF) has decided upon a 2016 Guyana Olympiad chess team without hosting a qualification competition to determine the competence of its participants.

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