EU worried over crime, drug trafficking in T&T

-working on catching ‘big fish’

(Trinidad Guardian) The European Union Delegation in T&T is concerned about the country’s crime situation and traces it to the illegal trafficking of drugs. That was stated by German ambassador Stefan Schlueter, who is holding the EU presidency in T&T. “Criminals act out of a sense of impunity because the crime detection rate in T&T is very low,” the ambassador said at a media conference by the EU delegation at its Queen’s Park West, Port-of-Spain, office last Friday.

The delegation called the conference to announce its celebration on Human Rights Day of the award of the Nobel Peace Prize 2012 to the European Union (EU).

Daniela Tramacere, Charge d’Affaires of T&T’s EU Delegation said the prize was awarded to the EU in recognition of its work on reconciliation, democracy, promotion of human rights and in enlarging the area of peace and stability among European countries and around the world. Asked about EU activities in T&T, Tramacere said it was already working with Caricom’s Implementation Agency for Crime and Security (IMPACS). “We are supporting efforts at the regional level,” she added  She said the figures were more or less clear concerning crime in T&T and the Caribbean and referred to the Caricom draft of a regional crime strategy.

Tramacere said according to analyses done by the UN Development Programme, crime was on the increase in the region and the eastern Caribbean continues to be a trans-shipment point for illegal drugs coming from South America. The illegal trafficking of drugs resulted in an increase in human trafficking and small arms, leading to more gang warfare, Tramacere added.

The EU is also thinking of supporting the Ministry of National Security’s Citizens Security Programme, which worked with people in at-risk crime communities, she said. The EU in T&T was also assisting in police service and judicial reform and the prevention of money laundering, Schlueter said. He said it was working on getting the “Mr Bigs” in the drugs trade but one of the challenges in going after the big fishes was an inadequate witness protection programme.

Comments

About these comments

The comments section is intended to provide a forum for reasoned and reasonable debate on the newspaper's content and is an extension of the newspaper and what it has become well known for over its history: accuracy, balance and fairness. We reserve the right to edit or delete comments which contain attacks on other users, slander, coarse language and profanity, and gratuitous and incendiary references to race and ethnicity.

Get the day's headlines from SN in your inbox every morning:

Most Read This Week

  1. The medical school sign on the Buddy’s building

    Buddy’s Pool Hall, Night Club closed after business falls

  2. Barry Dataram

    Who is to blame for Dataram escape?

  3. Lakeram Kewlachand

    Gangaram man takes his own life

  4. Wayne Isaacs (New York Post photograph)

    Guyanese-born cop charged with killing unarmed civilian in NY

  5. The Rio Inn at Forshaw and Oronoque Streets

    Teen shot dead outside Rio nightclub

  6. Courtenay Griffith’s home in Lodge that is earmarked to be demolished.

    City to tear down 52 derelict buildings

  7. Barry Dataram

    Absent Barry Dataram found guilty of drug trafficking

  8. The bus in the trench along Homestretch Avenue.

    Bus ends up in Homestretch trench

  9. Ryan Sergeant

    Youth killed, friend wounded after nightclub shooting


Recommended For You