Western movie character actor Harry Carey Jr. dies at 91

LOS ANGELES, (Reuters) – Veteran character actor Harry Carey Jr., who appeared in scores of television shows and films including nine of famed movie director John Ford’s classic Hollywood Westerns, has died at age 91, his family said on Friday.

Carey, a frequent supporting player in films starring John Wayne, died peacefully of natural causes on Thursday morning in the seaside town of Santa Barbara, California, surrounded by family members, said his daughter, Melinda Carey.

“No cancer or nothing, he just got old,” she said of her father, who is survived by his wife of 68 years, Marilyn, and three adult children.

Carey’s more notable big-screen credits included a co-starring role with John Wayne in Ford’s 1948 outlaw film “3 Godfathers,” the role of a young calvary officer in Ford’s 1949 western “She Wore a Yellow Ribbon,” also with Wayne, and a turn decades later in a saloon scene in the 1990 sci-fi comedy “Back to the Future Part III.”

In all, he made 11 movie appearances with Wayne.

Harry Carey Jr

Among other Ford-directed films in which Carey appeared were “The Searchers” (1956), “Wagon Master” (1950) and “Rio Grande” (1950).
In addition to a prodigious movie career that encompassed more than 90 films, Carey was a fixture on television during an era when westerns proliferated on the small screen, popping up in various character roles on such prime-time hits as “Bonanza,” “Gun-smoke” and “Wagon Train” in the 1960s and 1970s.

In the 1950s, he had a recurring role in “The Adventures of Spin and Marty,” a series of TV shorts that aired as part of “The Mickey Mouse Club.”
Carey was born in 1921, the son of silent film star Harry Carey and his wife, Olive, who also was an actress.

The young Carey was raised among cattle and horses on his parents’ 1,000-acre (405 hectares) ranch in California’s Santa Clarita Valley, north of Los Angeles, and he earned the nickname “Dobe” because his hair color was the hue of the ranch’s reddish adobe clay. Even late in life, he went by that nickname.

THE JOHN FORD STOCK COMPANY
The family’s affiliation with Ford dated back to the director’s earliest westerns, with Carey’s father appearing in some of Ford’s silent films in 1917.

During World War Two, the younger Carey worked with Ford on training and propaganda films for the U.S. military. He went on to become a regular performer, along with his father, in the John Ford Stock Company – actors and crew members who Ford used repeatedly in his films. Carey Jr. was reported to be the last surviving member of Ford’s stock company.

Carey’s first feature collaboration with Ford in “3 Godfathers,” playing the Abilene Kid, saw Carey, Wayne and Mexican-born actor Pedro Armendariz co-star as cattle rustlers and bank robbers who care for an orphaned baby boy while dodging the law. Carey’s father starred in the original 1919 version, also directed by Ford.

Carey began his association with Wayne in another 1948 release, the classic Howard Hawks Western movie “Red River,” which also starred the elder Carey, though father and son had no scenes together.

Among Carey’s last screen appearances were his turn as a U.S. marshal in the 1993 film “Tombstone,” which starred Val Kilmer and Kurt Russell, and a supporting role in the 1997 TV movie “Last Stand at Saber River,” which starred Tom Selleck.

The Carey family ranch, which was visited over the years by Wayne and fellow actors William S. Hart and Gary Cooper, has been turned into a Los Angeles County historic park called Tesoro Adobe.

Laurene Weste, city councilwoman in Santa Clarita, said Carey Jr. remains a beloved figure in the area where the family ranch was once so prominent. “He was just a wonderful, loving, kind, down-to-Earth man,” she said.

More in World News

default placeholder

Islamic State claims responsibility for Kabul attack, 80 dead

KABUL (Reuters) – Twin explosions tore through a demonstration by members of Afghanistan’s mainly Shi’ite Hazara minority in Kabul yesterday, killing at least 80 people and wounding more than 230 in a suicide attack claimed by Islamic State.

default placeholder

Spy agencies struggle to spot threats from lone, mentally ill attackers

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Recent attacks on civilians in the US and Europe have exposed a gap in the intelligence community’s efforts to track suspected extremists and prevent mass killings, a half dozen American, British and French counterterrorism officials told Reuters.

default placeholder

Turkey’s Erdogan shuts schools, charities in first state of emergency decree

ISTANBUL/ANKARA (Reuters) – President Tayyip Erdogan tightened his grip on Turkey yesterday, ordering the closure of thousands of private schools, charities and other institutions in his first decree since imposing a state of emergency after the failed military coup.

default placeholder

Heavy rain in China kills at least 87, thousands evacuated

SHANGHAI (Reuters) – Heavy rain in China has killed at least 87 people and forced thousands from their homes, state media reported yesterday.

default placeholder

Munich gunman raised locally, had no ties to Islamic state -police

BERLIN, (Reuters) – A German-Iranian teenager who shot and killed nine people and then himself in Munich on Friday had received psychiatric care and was in all probability a lone gunman who had no ties to Islamic State, police said.

A screen grab taken from video footage shows a view of the Olympia shopping mall, the scene of a shooting rampage in Munich, Germany July 22, 2016. Marc Mueller/Handout via REUTERS

German-Iranian gunman kills at least nine in Munich shopping mall

MUNICH,  (Reuters) – An 18-year-old German-Iranian gunman who apparently acted alone opened fire in a busy shopping mall in Munich last evening, killing at least nine people in the third attack against civilians in Western Europe in eight days.

Comments

About these comments

The comments section is intended to provide a forum for reasoned and reasonable debate on the newspaper's content and is an extension of the newspaper and what it has become well known for over its history: accuracy, balance and fairness. We reserve the right to edit or delete comments which contain attacks on other users, slander, coarse language and profanity, and gratuitous and incendiary references to race and ethnicity.



Stay updated! Follow Stabroek News on Facebook or Twitter.

Get the day's headlines from SN in your inbox every morning: