Corriverton crash victims recovering in hospital

Murshid (leader) of the Guyana Islamic Trust (GIT) Haseeb Yusuf and the two foreigners who were severely injured after the car they were travelling in collided with a truck at Skeldon, Corriverton in Berbice remain patients at the Georgetown Public Hospital.

CT scans were done on the three men over the course of the weekend, and the results are to be made available on Tuesday, a source said.

Yusuf, 52, of Nandy Park, East Bank Demerara, who was the owner of the Toyota Spacio car PPP 1445, sustained possible head injuries and is currently a patient in the High Dependency Unit (HDU).

“He is doing a little better. Earlier today [yesterday] he wasn’t having any feeling in his left side, and the doctors thought it was his brain or neck. They [doctors] gave him a neck brace and that is easing the pain. He is also communicating with his family,” the source said.

Yusuf had been pinned under the car and it took some time for him to be freed from the crushed vehicle.

Fareed Abdus Sami, 17, of Jamaica and Zaahir Ibn Waqar, 20, of Pennsylvania, USA, two students of the Guyana Islamic Institute (GII) at Zeeburg, West Coast Demerara are patients in the Male Surgical Ward of the hospital, where Sami is nursing a broken pelvic and Waqar a broken thigh.

The three men had travelled to Line Path, Skeldon the previous day to make preparations for a GIT convention that was scheduled to be held yesterday.

They were on their way to the Skeldon Mosque for the Fajr (early morning) prayer when tragedy struck. Reports are the truck that is attached to the Skeldon Sugar Estate turned suddenly in front of the car.

They were rushed to the Skeldon Hospital where they were treated and immediately referred to the New Amsterdam Hospital (NAH), from where they were later transferred to the Georgetown Public Hospital.


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