Guyana Review

Rohee’s riot act

Former Police Commissioner  Henry Greene

Home Affais Minister Clement Rohee is nothing if not the People’s Progressive Party’s (PPP) lightning rod for controversy. Generally regarded as one of the administration’s toughest adherents to an uncompromising party political line Rohee was appointed Foreign Affairs Minister in 1992 on the back of the PPP/C’s elections victory and a promise by the late President Cheddi Jagan to curb the excesses of the Ministry.

Playing to the West Indies’ weaknesses

Standout: Shivnarine Chanderpaul at the crease

Australia’s seemingly somewhat risky declaration on the penultimate day of the first test match in the current series against the West Indies was reflective of a belief that not much had changed in Caribbean cricket at least as far as the will to win was concerned.

Ramotar rises

Guyana’s Seventh Executive President takes office

Freedom House

Long before Donald Ramotar was eventually chosen by the People’s Progressive Party (PPP) to be its presidential candidate at the 2011 general elections, there was talk that a way was being sought to have Bharrat Jagdeo circumvent the constitutional provision which he himself had signed into law in order to have a third presidential term.

An unchanged political landscape

Elections fever

What Guyanese usually become preoccupied with whenever the country goes to the polls – apart from who will win the elections, of course  – is whether or not the outcome will be attended by violence, race on race violence.

Who gets the Speaker’s job

The political row over the choice of a Speaker of the National Assembly may well have raised concerns over the likely effectiveness of the parliamentary opposition

Ralph Ramkarran

A mere of two months after the Alliance for Change (AFC) and A Partnership for National Unity (APNU) polled sufficient votes to secure a single seat more than the People’s Progressive Party/Civic (PPP/C) in the National Assembly, questions have arisen as to just how effective a parliamentary opposition they are likely to be.

A moment of political truth

A conversation with Speaker of the National Assembly Raphael Trotman

Raphael Trotman

Raphael Trotman readily concedes that the political tumult that preceded his belated emergence as the Speaker of the National Assembly makes his eventual accession to office a wholly unexpected turn of events.

Tomorrow and the world

Nicholas Laughlin on reading Martin Carter while following the Egyptian revolution

Martin Carter

For most of the past eighteen days, I’ve kept Al Jazeera’s website open on my laptop and Martin Carter’s poems close at hand.

The brain-drain panic returns


By Jagdish Bhagwati Jagdish Bhagwati, Professor of Economics and Law at Columbia University and Senior Fellow in International Economics at the Council on Foreign Relations, recently edited, with Gordon Hanson, Skilled Migration Today.

Who cares about Guyana’s cricket, anyway

Dr Bharrat Jagdeo

That the Government of Guyana ascribes an altruistic motive to its intervention in the feuding among the rival factions in the struggle for control of the Guyana Cricket Board (GCB) which had placed local cricket in an even more perilous state than it had been previously, does little to disguise the fact that the intervention was “political,” initiated as it was by President Bharrat Jagdeo during his last few months in office.