Challenging corporal punishment

This week, The Scene begins a short series on corporal punishment with the objective of looking at alternatives to it. Today, as an introduction, we take a general look at the issue.

What is corporal punishment?

Punishment that uses physical force to cause pain – even slight pain. Corporal punishment can be administered using the hand or an object

Why is it important to talk about it now?

Guyana will soon decide whether teachers should be allowed to use corporal punishment in schools. Because in any case, we should constantly examine how well or how badly we are protecting and teaching our children

Why should we take corporal punishment out of schools?

School corporal punishment affects the most vulnerable children: Children who are younger, from poor families, disabled, minorities and boys are beaten more often in school. Children who are slow learners or have disabilities like poor eyesight or problems hearing are often beaten in school because teachers think they are purposely behaving badly. There are cases where children with learning disabilities are promoted even though they are not ready and then beaten when they can’t keep up in class.

There have been numerous reports of young children having broken bones, bruises and other injuries from corporal punishment in schools.

How can teachers discipline children without corporal punishment?

Teachers can and should be trained in other ways to discipline children. The Ministry of Education must also provide additional support to schools to manage challenging situations.

CP Quiz

Corporal punishment creates better behaved children and a more orderly school and society. True or False

Answer False: Research shows that in the long term, children who have been beaten are more likely to resort to violence quickly. By using violence we teach violence.

Next week alternative methods of discipline

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