Soft wallaba

(Eperua falcata)

Soft walaba tree (Photo by R Thomas)

Soft Wallaba or Wallaba is a canopy tree and seems to have a preference for extreme soil types – from very hydromorphic soils to dry soils. It is considered a generalist species (occurring in all forest types); however, it is dominant on white sand soils and often occurs as co-dominant with
Ituri Wallaba (Eperua grandiflora). These forests are classified as Wallaba forests.

Wallaba is highly resistant to decay and subterranean termites, and also fairly resistant to drywood termites. These properties make it suitable for transmission poles, flagstaffs, railway sleepers, shingles and more. This species is also used in general heavy construction, utility and industrial floors and chemical vat staves. For minor uses, the heartwood contains nine per cent tannin, which can be extracted and used to tan leather, while the tannin in the bark is used for curing diarrhoea and dysentery.

Soft wallaba seedling
Soft walaba tree (Photo by R Thomas)

The seeds may be eaten by rodents in the event of scarcity of other seeds. The flowers are a staple resource for monkeys (howlers, spider, sakis) during the dry season.

Soft wallaba pods

Rain forests are rich in biodiversity and are home to many different plants and animals as well as indigenous communities. Humans, even those who don’t live in the rain forest, rely on it for resources such as building materials (wood and lianas),

medicine and fruits. Rain forests also provide esse

ntial environmental services for life on earth; they create soil as well as prevent soil erosion, produce oxygen though photosynthesis, maintain clean water systems, and are a key defence against climate change. 

The Iwokrama Rain Forest is 371,000 hectares, located in the heart of Guyana.  Our mission is to develop strategies for conservation and sustainable development for local people in Guyana and the world at large. We are involved in timber, tourism and training.  Come and visit us in the rain forest or at http://www.iwokrama.org.

Comments  

From Mary and Jesus to Herod

Since the festival of Christmas commands a pre-eminent position – of observance and celebration – on Guyana’s Annual Calendar of National Events, I thought I’d pen a few lines to provoke thought and meditation relevant to the “Real Reason for the Season”.

By ,

Poems of Succession and ‘The When Time’

To mark the anniversary of Martin Carter’s passing on December 13, 1997, Gemma Robinson looks at Carter’s Poems of Succession, published 40 years ago this year.

Abuse and broken leadership

By Naicelis Rozema-Elkins   It is about time, past due in fact, that the problem of sexual assault by teachers in our school system is addressed.

Focus on Guyana’s National Budget 2018

Focus on Guyana’s National Budget 2018 represents the twenty-eighth edition of this Ram & McRae annual publication which highlights, reviews and comments on the major issues surrounding and raised in the National Budget.

By ,

The illusion of freedom in the digital age

By Mark Leonard LONDON – Over the last few weeks, media around the world have been saturated with stories about how technology is destroying politics.

Your browser is out-of-date!

Update your browser to view this website correctly.

We built stabroeknews.com using new technology. This makes our website faster, more feature rich and easier to use for 95% of our readers.
Unfortunately, your browser does not support some of these technologies. Click the button below and choose a modern browser to receive our intended user experience.

Update my browser now

×