Amazon Caribbean noticing negative effects over stalled anti-laundering bill

Amazon Caribbean Guyana Ltd is calling on private sector organisations to voice their concerns about stalled negotiations on the Anti-Money Laundering Bill as these delays are already having adverse effects on its shipments to European markets.

“Transactions are getting more complicated. Business entities have expressed suspicion towards Guyana,” CEO Jean-Francois Gerin said in a press statement. “North American and European customers can quickly boycott products from Guyana once they feel our country is not putting sufficient effort into fighting money laundering or people and drugs smuggling.”

As such, the company, which employs farmers, casual harvesters and other employees, is calling on the Georgetown Chamber of Commerce and Industry, the Private Sector Commission, the Guyana Manufacturing and Services Association and all other organisations representing the private sector to voice their concern about this situation. At a time when Guyana is inviting investors, some European investors have already expressed their concern about starting a business in Guyana or investing in an existing one, the company said.

The company said it adheres to the IFS Food Defence Act, which calls for security and control procedures from supply to delivery to the customers. It has also always been shipping through one agency, in order to control its shipments.

The company said it wishes to reassure its customers and the public at large that existing strict security measures will still be reinforced to ensure the safety of its products and exports.

The Company said it wished to reaffirm that it has specific contracts with some farmers supplying pineapples and hearts of palm to its factories. All transactions purchasing fruits for processing are monitored by its head office in Georgetown. The company said it has not delegated to any individual, other than the personnel designated by the Mainstay Association of Farmers, to sell pineapples from the Mainstay area for processing and export.  The company reaffirms also that its products are not available locally for re-export. All sales are done solely by its Head Office.

Its recounting of these arrangements come in the wake of another alleged plot involving the Italian mafia and Mexican cartels to ship cocaine out of Guyana in cans.

Amazon Caribbean has been a food processor in Guyana for over 26 years, exporting organic pineapples and heart of palm fruit to Europe.

Comments  

Charlestown shop owner shot during altercation

The police say they are investigating a shooting incident which occurred about 11:20 am today at Leopold and Breda streets, Charlestown during which shop owner, Jacqueline Lagnah, 55, of 83 Leopold and Breda streets, sustained two suspected gunshot injuries to her lower back.

Wave of looting shutters stores, spreads fear in Venezuela

CARACAS/SAN CRISTOBAL, Venezuela,  (Reuters) – A wave of looting by hungry mobs across Venezuela has left streets of shuttered shops in provincial towns and pushed some store owners to arm themselves with guns and machetes, stirring fear that the turmoil could spread to the capital Caracas.

NY man gets 41 years for killing Guyanese girl

Taariq Stephens (New York Daily News photo) A Brooklyn man got a 41-year maximum prison sentence yesterday for killing a 16-year-old Guyanese girl who authorities said rejected his advances.

Debutant Ngidi leads South Africa to series victory v India

PRETORIA,  (Reuters) – Debutant Lungi Ngidi took six wickets as South Africa defeated India by 135 runs to claim victory in the second test in Pretoria today and also win the series with an unassailable 2-0 lead in the three-match contest.

T&T judge grants injunction stopping highway project

(Trinidad Guardian) Environmental activist group Fishermen and Friends of the Sea (FFOS) has obtained an interim injunction barring the Government from continuing work on the first phase of the $400M Churchill Roosevelt Highway Extension to Manzanilla.

Your browser is out-of-date!

Update your browser to view this website correctly.

We built stabroeknews.com using new technology. This makes our website faster, more feature rich and easier to use for 95% of our readers.
Unfortunately, your browser does not support some of these technologies. Click the button below and choose a modern browser to receive our intended user experience.

Update my browser now

×