G7 leaders back 2015 deal, aim to build on US momentum

BRUSSELS/PARIS, (Reuters) – The world’s leading industrialised nations gave their backing yesterday to a new global deal on climate change in 2015 after promises from the United States at the start of the week galvanised flagging momentum.

The United States’ plan to cut emissions from power plants by 30 percent by 2030 prompted the European Union into a defence of its own record.

China, the world’s biggest emitter of greenhouse gases, also gave a hint that it would set some kind of cap on its emissions.

In a communique after summit talks in Brussels, the G7 leaders affirmed their “strong determination” to adopt a new global deal in 2015 that is “ambitious, inclusive and reflects changing global circumstances”.

It said the G7 nations – Britain, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan and the United States – remained committed to low-carbon economies and limiting temperature rises to 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels, the limit scientists say can prevent the most devastating effects of climate change.

The communique also committed nations to announcing national contributions to reducing emissions by the first quarter of next year, ahead of a Paris conference on deciding a global deal in December 2015.

 

BRUSSELS/PARIS, (Reuters) – The world’s leading industrialised nations gave their backing yesterday to a new global deal on climate change in 2015 after promises from the United States at the start of the week galvanised flagging momentum.

The United States’ plan to cut emissions from power plants by 30 percent by 2030 prompted the European Union into a defence of its own record.

China, the world’s biggest emitter of greenhouse gases, also gave a hint that it would set some kind of cap on its emissions.

In a communique after summit talks in Brussels, the G7 leaders affirmed their “strong determination” to adopt a new global deal in 2015 that is “ambitious, inclusive and reflects changing global circumstances”.

It said the G7 nations – Britain, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan and the United States – remained committed to low-carbon economies and limiting temperature rises to 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels, the limit scientists say can prevent the most devastating effects of climate change.

The communique also committed nations to announcing national contributions to reducing emissions by the first quarter of next year, ahead of a Paris conference on deciding a global deal in December 2015.

 

SECURE SUPPLIES

 

At the same time, the G7 offered the EU support with its efforts to make its energy supplies more secure, promising to “complement the efforts of the European Commission to develop emergency energy plans for winter 2014-2015”.In Europe, the quest for energy security in the face of threats from Russia that it could disrupt supplies of gas pumped through Ukraine, has knocked the climate debate down the agenda.

But Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso, in an address at the start of the G7 summit, said the issues went “hand in hand”.

 

At the same time, the G7 offered the EU support with its efforts to make its energy supplies more secure, promising to “complement the efforts of the European Commission to develop emergency energy plans for winter 2014-2015”.In Europe, the quest for energy security in the face of threats from Russia that it could disrupt supplies of gas pumped through Ukraine, has knocked the climate debate down the agenda.

But Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso, in an address at the start of the G7 summit, said the issues went “hand in hand”.

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