Erdogan vows reconciliation after Turkish presidential win

ANKARA, (Reuters) – Tayyip Erdogan secured his place in history as Turkey’s first directly elected head of state yesterday, taking him a step closer to the presidential system he covets in a result his opponents fear heralds an increasingly authoritarian rule.

Supporters honking car horns and waving flags took to the streets in the capital Ankara after results on Turkish television said Erdogan, the prime minister for more than a decade, had won 52 percent of the vote, 13 points more than his closest rival and avoiding the need for a second round runoff.

The chairman of the High Election Board confirmed Erdogan had a majority, with more than 99 percent of votes counted, and said full provisional figures would be announced on Monday.

“Today is a new day, a milestone for Turkey, the birthday of Turkey, of its rebirth from the ashes,” Erdogan, 60, told thousands of supporters in a victory speech from the balcony of his ruling AK Party headquarters in Ankara.

Comments  

Barcelona van attackers plotted major bombings, Spanish court hears

MADRID, (Reuters) – An Islamist militant cell that last week used a van to kill 13 people in Barcelona had planned one or several major bomb attacks, possibly against churches or monuments, one suspect told a court yesterday, according to sources close to the investigation.

Muslim divorce law “unconstitutional”, rules India’s top court

NEW DELHI, (Reuters) – India’s Supreme Court yesterday ruled a Muslim instant divorce law unconstitutional, a landmark victory for Muslim women who have spent decades arguing that it violated their right to equality.

U.S. puts more pressure on Pakistan to help with Afghan war

WASHINGTON,  (Reuters) – The United States suggested yesterday it could cut U.S. aid to Pakistan or downgrade Islamabad’s status as a major non-NATO ally to pressure the South Asian nation to do more to help it with the war in Afghanistan.

Commentary: The threat to internet freedom in Trump’s America

(Emily Parker is a former staff writer for The Wall Street Journal and policy advisor in the U.S.

Panama says to demand visas from Venezuelans, slams Maduro

PANAMA CITY, (Reuters) – Panama’s government said yesterday that from October Venezuelans wishing to enter the country would need a visa, accusing the administration of Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro of undermining democracy at home and security abroad.

Your browser is out-of-date!

Update your browser to view this website correctly.

We built stabroeknews.com using new technology. This makes our website faster, more feature rich and easier to use for 95% of our readers.
Unfortunately, your browser does not support some of these technologies. Click the button below and choose a modern browser to receive our intended user experience.

Update my browser now

×