West Africans fill churches to pray for deliverance from ‘devil’ Ebola

MONROVIA/FREETOWN, (Reuters) – People in Sierra Leone and Liberia filled churches on Sunday to seek deliverance from an outbreak of the deadly Ebola virus, defying official warnings to avoid public gatherings to contain an epidemic that has killed nearly 1,000 people in West Africa.

With their creaking healthcare systems completely overrun, Sierra Leone and Liberia have both declared states of emergency to tackle the highly contagious and incurable disease, which has also stricken neighbouring Guinea.

People still flocked to sing and pray at churches in Liberia’s ramshackle ocean-front capital Monrovia, many of them comparing Ebola to the brutal civil war that ravaged the country between 1989 and 2003, killing nearly a quarter of a million people.

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Barcelona van attackers plotted major bombings, Spanish court hears

MADRID, (Reuters) – An Islamist militant cell that last week used a van to kill 13 people in Barcelona had planned one or several major bomb attacks, possibly against churches or monuments, one suspect told a court yesterday, according to sources close to the investigation.

Muslim divorce law “unconstitutional”, rules India’s top court

NEW DELHI, (Reuters) – India’s Supreme Court yesterday ruled a Muslim instant divorce law unconstitutional, a landmark victory for Muslim women who have spent decades arguing that it violated their right to equality.

U.S. puts more pressure on Pakistan to help with Afghan war

WASHINGTON,  (Reuters) – The United States suggested yesterday it could cut U.S. aid to Pakistan or downgrade Islamabad’s status as a major non-NATO ally to pressure the South Asian nation to do more to help it with the war in Afghanistan.

Commentary: The threat to internet freedom in Trump’s America

(Emily Parker is a former staff writer for The Wall Street Journal and policy advisor in the U.S.

Panama says to demand visas from Venezuelans, slams Maduro

PANAMA CITY, (Reuters) – Panama’s government said yesterday that from October Venezuelans wishing to enter the country would need a visa, accusing the administration of Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro of undermining democracy at home and security abroad.

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