Tourism Association launched

20161125glimps-1Private investors in the promising eco-tourism subsector yesterday launched the Tourism Association of Guyana (TAG) and its first elected president Tony Thorne says tourist markets in North America and Europe will be targeted “to put Guyana back on the world map”.

Members of the association include two foreign airlines and the local Guyana Airways Corporation and a wide range of tour operators, who have launched out in the field since eco-tourism Guyana style became a real possibility.

The executive which will run the organization for the next year include Boyo Ramsaroop, First Vice-President, Bibi Zacharia, second vice-president, Merlyn Meckdeci, secretary, Junior Garnett, Treasurer and GAC’s Lennox Canterbury, Astel Paul and Onassis Stanley as executive members.

City firm on removing Regent Street vendors

PG4&25.QXDCITY Council spokesman Walter Jordan yesterday confirmed that vendors on Regent Street will be moved and offered temporary accommodation on Merriman’s Mall between Orange Walk and Camp Street.

Jordan says that vendors encumber free movement on the pavements and leave their trash lying around in addition to contravening the law. He said the City Council will begin moving the vendors “shortly”.

He said the vendors will be moved in a “nice way”. “We admit that people try to catch their hand” at Christmas time Jordan told Stabroek News adding this is why they will be offered the temporary lodging on Merriman’s Mall.

Yesterday attorney-at- law Neville Bissember is­sued a statement urging the City Council not to take this action. Bissember said he is currently defending someone who was charged with encum­bering the pavement and on Tuesday decided to visit Regent Street for an assessment. Bissember says he is “satisfied beyond any reasonable doubt that the vendors on the pavement are in no way obstructing passersby or in any way encum­bering” the sidewalk.

He contended that if the City Council went ahead and forcibly removed the vendors it would be a “mere exag­geration of puny powers” “I strongly suggest that the exercise not be carried out” he said, adding that “there are so many other important matters which should engage the atten­tion of the City Fathers.”

Water should be restored to Industrial Site today

GEORGETOWN Sewerage and Water Commissioners Chief En­gineer, David Dewar, says that water supply should be restored to the In­dustrial Site area today after a one week interrup­tion.

Dewar told Stabroek News yesterday that ini­tially a damaged motor in the pump located in the Sanata Textiles Mill com­pound was the cause of the problem. However, when the motor was replaced, the pump did not work. Dewar says the motor was taken out and loosed apart and is now expected to work.

On Tuesday. Con­tinental Industries Limited, which suffered a 30 per cent production cut as a result of the problem, said its emulsion paint operations which require water had ground to a halt. The company was reduced to canning paint which it had produced earlier. Its confectionery and plastics products line were also af­fected.

 

Editorial

Cambios

Fears have been expressed in some quarters that a new government may discontinue the cambio system. We sincerely hope this is wrong as we believe it would be singularly misguided.

The cambio is blamed for pushing up the cost of living. We do not accept this. It is not the cambios that led to the huge devaluation of our currency but falling production and lack of confidence. Before the cambios were introduced, a very large number of items were available in the blackmarket at prices that reflected the cost of currency on “Wall Street.”

The introduction of cambios achieved two im­portant positive effects. First, it enabled businessmen, farmers and ordinary citizens to im­port vital supplies without breaking the law. It undoubtedly led to an increase in production in several areas as raw materials, spare parts and equipment became available. Some factories that had only been operating at a fraction of capacity are doing better. Secondly, it may have led initially to a further flight of capital (that had been going on anyway) but now people feel safe in holding funds here or even bringing them in. The system breeds financial confidence.

The government must be congratulated on the good sense it has shown in introducing the system and sticking with it, despite criticism. We believe it has helped in many ways. We sincerely hope any new government will think several times and will consult widely before tampering with this system which has been admired regionally by responsible persons.

 

 

Around the Web

Comments