Tiger Pond, Meriwau hard-hit by drought

-GWI taking steps

Tiger Pond and Meriwau in the Rupununi have been hard hit by the ongoing drought and the Guyana Water Inc is taking steps to alleviate the situation.

A release from GWI yesterday said that during a recent visit it was found that the pond at Tiger Pond had dried up for the first time.

“In addition, the hand dug wells are dry and the community has to walk approximately 1 km to access water from a creek. To assist, GWI will be providing pipes and fittings to connect the spring to the water system within the community to ensure that water is available at the local school and other parts of the community”, GWI said.

At Meriwau, it was found that the hand dug wells utilized by the community are dry. According to the GWI Executive Director, Ramchand Jailall, “it is pivotal that a deep well be drilled for the community of Meriwau since the hand dug wells utilized by the community have dried up”. He further stated that GWI has commenced collaborating with the Regional Administration on a solution.  The Regional Administration plans to drill several new wells in the Region for 2016.

“Armed with these facts we are now prepared to work with the RDC on solutions for dealing with the effects of the prolonged dry season”, stated Jailal, “we will be utilizing the advice of the Hydro-Geologist  to create long term solutions for the Region”.

GWI said that the team observed that the communities of Haiwa, Nappi and Parishara have wells which are still producing water for the communities. According to the Executive Director, “it is pivotal to monitor the water level in these wells which have been drilled by different agencies including, GWI and the Basic Needs Trust Fund (BNTF). Therefore, GWI is advancing activities to ensure that the ‘head plate’ on each well makes provision for consistent measurement of the level of water within the wells to determine if there is any depletion”.

While visiting the village of Quarrie, GWI said that the team observed several hand dug wells which were dry.  However, the village has a well at the local school which is equipped with an elevated storage tank.  According to Jailal, “we are recommending stand pipes be extended at convenient locations within the community which will provide water from the elevated storage tank”. GWI will provide fittings and pipes to assist with this intervention.

During the assessment of Pipang Village, which sources its water from a spring, GWI said that it was observed that the spring was flowing at a low rate. However, the community constructed a ‘hand dug spring box’ which is presently being used to supply the residents. According to the GWI Executive Director, “it is strongly recommended that chlorine tablets be distributed to the community as there is a risk of contamination from animals. GWI will provide cement to develop the structure around the spring in order to secure it from any risk of contamination from animals”.

During the visit to Sand Creek, the team found that the school and dormitory are being supplied from a hand dug well and a photo voltaic system. The level of water within the well was low and water is only pumped when the level in the well rises after pumping. Several leaks were seen on the water system which serves the school.  The team spoke with the Headmaster who agreed to deal with these leaks. The village is tapping water from hand dug wells and it was reported by the Region that three additional hand dug wells were successfully constructed over the last three months within the community and are producing adequate water.

“Armed with these facts we are now prepared to work with the RDC on solutions for dealing with the effects of the prolonged dry season”, Jailal said, adding that GWI will be utilising the advice of hydro-geologist, Roger Simon  to create long term solutions for the Region’.

The GWI team in Region 9 headed by the Regional Technician Engineer, Mark Jeffrey,  recently went  to Annai, Aishalton and Katoonarib  and provided assistance in ensuring water  is accessible within these communities.

 

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