Capuchinbird

The Capuchinbird (Perissocephalus tricolor) is a large thick-set suboscine passerine with a relatively heavy bill. Adults weigh between 340 and 420 grams (0.75 and 0.93 lb; 11.99 and 14.82 oz) and are typically around 40 centimetres (15.75 in) long, making it the largest suboscine passerine apart from the Amazonian and long-wattled umbrellabirds. Its plumage is overall rich brown, approaching orange on the belly and undertail coverts, and the remiges and short tail are black. The most distinctive feature is its bare, almost vulture-like head covered in dull blue skin. They gather in leks where they “sing”. The “song” is very odd and difficult to describe accurately, although some have compared it to the distant sound of a chainsaw or (as indicated by its alternative name “calfbird”) a cow mooing. They eat mainly fruits and insects.

Capuchinbird (Perissocephalus tricolor). At a lek near the Karanambu Lodge, North Rupununi. (Photo by Kester Clarke www.kesterclarke.net)

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