Valuing Ringbang and Eddy Grant’s contribution to Guyanese literature

Eddy Grant

Electric Avenue 

 

Down in the street there is violence 

And a lot of work to be done 

No place to hang out our washing 

And I can’t blame all on the sun, oh no 

 

We gonna rock down to Electric Avenue 

And then we’ll take it higher 

Oh we gonna rock down to Electric Avenue 

And then we’ll take it higher 

 

Workin’ so hard like a soldier 

Can’t afford a thing on TV 

Deep in my heart I’m a warrior 

Can’t get food for them kids, good God 

 

We gonna rock down to Electric Avenue 

And then we’ll take it higher 

Oh we gonna rock down to Electric Avenue 

And then we’ll take it higher 

 

Oh no 

Oh no 

Oh no 

Oh no 

 

Who is to blame in one country 

Never can get to the one 

Dealin’ in multiplication 

And they still can’t feed everyone, oh no 

 

We gonna rock down to Electric Avenue 

And then we’ll take it higher 

Oh we gonna rock down to Electric Avenue 

And then we’ll take it higher 

 

Out in the street 

Out in the street 

Out in the daytime 

Out in the night 

 

We gonna rock down to Electric Avenue 

And then we’ll take it higher 

Oh we gonna rock down to Electric Avenue 

And then we’ll take it higher 

 

Out in the street 

Out in the street 

Out in the playground 

In the dark side of town 

 

We gonna rock down to Electric Avenue 

And then we’ll take it higher 

Oh we gonna rock down to Electric Avenue 

And then we’ll take it higher 

 

Eddy Grant 

 

Edmond Montgomery Grant, more widely known to the world as Eddy Grant, was in the news recently because he was conferred with the degree Doctor of Letters by the University of Guyana at the institution’s 52nd Convocation. 

This honouring of one of Guyana’s greatest musical personalities is a statement about a number of things with wider resonance than the singer, songwriter, musician himself. It speaks about the university, the academy, popular music, and the literature of the country.

Dr Eddy Grant is an internationally renowned exponent of popular music, in the field of rock, reggae, soca and his own Caribbean hybrid Ringbang. This less known form, Ringbang, probably says more about him than any of the better known types that he has produced, because it has something to do with his legacy, the impact of his work and why he was decorated by the university.     ….

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