Green pleads for improvement to National Park rugby field

— says the home of local rugby littered with steel rods, broken bottles and other debris

The uneven playing surface which frequently causes sprained ankles and other injuries, is littered with steel rods, broken bottles and other debris.

The Guyana Rugby Football Union (GRFU) is “pleading” with the “powers that be” to give the National Park Commission the green light to make the Rugby field suitable once again for play and practice.

During yesterday’s debriefing of Sunday’s 58-14 rout of the national team by host, Cayman Islands, Peter Green, President of the union used the same platform to vent his frustration at the unsuitable playing surface for the ‘home’ of rugby.

Green pointed out that uneven surface which frequently causes sprained ankles and other injuries, is littered with steel rods, broken bottles and other debris.

He then disclosed that upgraded work of the playing area inclusive of floodlights  was promised almost two years ago by the National Sports Commission. But the debriefing which was held at the rugby field paints an ugly picture of what the country’s ambassadors are forced to use to prepare for international assignments.

Green stated that the lack of facilities and support is stymying the progress of the sport that has brought international acclaim to the 592. He added that “We are struggling with the substandard playing surfaces and we need the corporation of all and sundry. We can’t have ponies and cricketers and christians planting crosses on our playing fields.”

Peter Green yesterday pleaded with the “powers that be” to give the National Park Commission the green light to make the Rugby field suitable once again for play and practice.

The visibly upset GRFU head added “We had applied for our own land, we had plans drawn up and submitted to the NSC but we have continued to just get promises.”

Green then told the media that the union’s bid to host the Rugby America’s North (RAN) U-19 Championships was rejected simply because the sport rugby does not currently have a suitable playing area in these 83,000 square miles.

Despite the lack of support and broken promises, Manager of the team Sherlock Solomon was however optimistic of the future with regards to the young team which was captained by Jamal Angus.

“We lost but the performances of the young guys were commendable. We can build on the youngsters

Solomon added “We need better preparations and facilities, we need funding for camps  and trial matches internationally but I think we learned a lot from the exposure we got in Cayman.”

Green who cited the smaller playing area (61×91) in Cayman as one of the disadvantages the team faced, agreed with Solomon by echoing similar sentiments.

Guyana men’s 15s team went down by the 44-point margin after the two teams played for a chance to qualify for the America’s Rugby Challenge.

According to the Rugby Americas North (RAN) Facebook page: “Both teams played a dynamic, open-field running game that thrilled the 500 spectators at South Sound Rugby Club, but the consistent pressure by Cayman Islands turned to field position and often points, resulting in a clear victory for the hosts.”

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