Dr Cheddi Jagan: The man and his life

By Sharief Khan (An excerpt from an interview with Sharief Khan reprinted from Stabroek News, December 11, 1987, page 5) In gaining a politician like Cheddi Jagan Guyana might have lost a cricketer.

Dr Jagan was not given enough time -Janet Jagan

(Reprinted from Stabroek News Souvenir Edition, Monday, March 17, 1997, page 10) The widow of the late President, Janet Jagan, has expressed regret that her hus­band did not have enough time to fulfil the many dreams he harboured for his country and its citizens.

Tens of thousands pay their last respects

(Reprinted from the Souvenir Edition, Monday, March 17, 1997) Tens of thousands of Guyanese from all walks of life converge on State House and at the Albion Sports Complex ground between March 8-12, to pay their final respects to the late President, Dr Cheddi Jagan.

Wilson Harris, New World Writer

  Gemma Robinson teaches at the University of Stirling, Scotland. She is researching Wilson Harris’s poetry, and is the editor of University of Hunger: Collected Poems and Selected Prose of Martin Carter (Bloodaxe).

An independent state media

If it is true that Mr. Nigel Williams, the editor in chief of the Guyana Chronicle, was ‘taken aback’ by the level of public concern that met his decision to discontinue the weekly columns of Dr.

Displaying quiet competence

Before proceeding with today’s article, we refer to the Government’s announcement that nine companies are interested in the allocation of the remaining oil blocks and that it is exploring options for both direct engagement and selective bidding.

A band of brothers

The group of strong, young friends in their 20s, had all signed up for their foreign adventure when the wily recruiters passed through the farming village in Bancoorah District, West Bengal promising steady jobs and good money.

The ExxonMobil advertisement

The authorities have decided to remove the Guyana Sugar Corporation (GUYSUCO) from the portfolio of entities under the Ministry of Agriculture and place it under the Ministry of Finance via the National Industrial and Commercial Investments Ltd.

“To foil the shock of rude invader…”

-The army and the village-guardians

-National Flag, Corentyne’s Children “Her children pledge each faithful hour To guard Guyana’s Lands To foil the shock of rude invaders Who’d violate her earth To cherish and defend forever The state that gave them birth” The foregoing, of course is just a snatch from our Guyana’s Song of the Republic.

The pair of Protestants

Trouble started aboard the “Hesperus” sailing ship from the time the ruthless 25 year-olds Henry Jacobs and his friend Charles James Wiltshire were appointed the only two interpreters for the mixed group of 167 pioneering Indians bound for British Guiana (B.G).

The shape of water   

It was still stuffy when the 22 men stealthily set off for the swift-moving river, slinking among the shadows in single file and silence late one Monday night, as they sought to spot snatches of the water through the bushes in the sickly light of a slivered moon.

A father and fleas

For nearly four long months aboard the crammed “Whitby” the two little girls precariously hung on to life, as grown men groaned, suffered and died in the low, dark deck of the sailing ship.

Fossil fuels: in danger of losing our way

On 8th February 2018, the same day the Guyana International Petroleum Business Summit and Exhibition (GIPEX) began and the vice president of ExxonMobil, Lisa Waters, was playing up the need for world economic growth to help the poor, an article by Ted Nordhaus was published in the influential Foreign Affairs magazine entitled The Two-Degree Delusion: The Dangers of an Unrealistic Climate Change Target (FA: 08/02/18), in which he said something similar but suggested that social development  will be better achieved if we liberate fossil fuels and oil and gas in particular from the strictures placed upon them by the 2015 United Nations climate change conference in Paris.