Every Man, Woman and Child in Guyana Must Become Oil-Minded

The 2016 Petroleum Agreement compared – More than mere tweaks

Part 31   Introduction I must start this week’s column by publicly complimenting the painstaking and excellent work done by the technical staff of Ram & McRae in comparing, line by line and word by word, the 1999 Janet Jagan’s Agreement with Esso and the Raphael Trotman’s 2016 Agreement with Esso (not Exxon), Hess and CNOOC.

Guineas and races

Paid at least “a guinea” or about 21 shillings for each Indian indentured immigrant delivered alive to the destination colonies in the West Indies, seasoned medical doctors appointed as surgeons-superintendents wielded significant power aboard commercial “coolie-carrying” ships.

Actually separating political power

‘Government should be set up so that no man need be afraid of another.’ Charles-Louis Baron de Montesquieu I can say without fear of contradiction that the vast majority of us would accept the above as a useful general rule.

RISE UP – Time to Speak

By Andaiye, Moses Bhagwan and Eusi Kwayana Sometimes in political life, movements that promise relief to the majority of the population fail to perform and are left to flounder and crash.

Disrupting local politics

The ancient Greeks, considered the progenitors of modern democracy, referred to the rule of one person as ‘tyranny’ and particularly in countries with weak institutions, modern presidentialism and prime ministership quickly morph into one-man autocracies in which the single leader, to whom access is limited, surrounds himself with a retinue of fawning, usually self-seeking, followers (Foley, Michael (2000) The British Presidency,  Manchester University Press, and Poguntke, Thomas and Paul Webb (2005) The Presidentialization of Politics,  Oxford University Press).

Ending ethnic political conflict

I have repeatedly argued that the attempts to establish ethnic dominance of various sorts by different means are unnecessary and cannot solve the ethnic security problem that exists in Guyana and I have often been asked to outline what form of government best suits our condition.

Breaking the Silence

Every time we impose our will on another, it is an act of violence –Mohandas Karamchand (Mahatma) Gandhi By The Caribbean Voice The Caribbean Voice is a New York-based NGO that has been involved in social activism since its launch in 1998 The 16 Days of Activism Against Gender-Based Violence, a global campaign from 25 November through 10 December, took place this year against the backdrop of an unprecedented global outcry.

From Mary and Jesus to Herod

- and other characters from The Nativity

Since the festival of Christmas commands a pre-eminent position – of observance and celebration – on Guyana’s Annual Calendar of National Events, I thought I’d pen a few lines to provoke thought and meditation relevant to the “Real Reason for the Season”.

Joy, pickpockets and gluttony

A woman’s purse was snatched. Stunned, she tearfully held her head as her cash, ATM cards and ID were in the hands of a thief, who ran through the unaware crowd too fast to be apprehended and too desperate to care about the devastating effects of his actions.

Regarding our third coalition Christmas

-the baby Jesus after the Nativity

Let’s agree that many of you – my “regulars” – might be allowing yourselves to be caught up in the hurly-burly homestretch to December 25 that Christmas Day widely known now to be misplaced.

The din of dreary drums

The sharp scent of freshly ground spices, the cooking of traditional foods and the dull drone of drums like the dholak and the tabla would have helped make the tough ship-rolling-journey more bearable for the Indian indentured immigrants during the “Sheila’s” maiden trip to the West Indies.

The ruckus in Parliament

Photos and interviews by Bebi Oosman and Shamar Mesua This week, the man and woman in the street shared their views on the recent events that unfolded in Parliament during the consideration of the budget estimates on Monday.

Put Guyana First

Hecklers, offensive statements that go against the nature of national unity, a surprise appearance by a Santa Claus, secrets exposed around oil bonuses – haven’t the Guyanese people been betrayed enough?

Poems of Succession and ‘The When Time’

To mark the anniversary of Martin Carter’s passing on December 13, 1997, Gemma Robinson looks at Carter’s Poems of Succession, published 40 years ago this year.

OK to criticize Venezuela, but turn a blind eye on Honduras? Not really

At a time when the United States should be going out of its way to stop a dangerous regression toward dictatorships in Latin America, the Trump administration — which to its credit has denounced the power grabs by the leftist leaders of Venezuela, Bolivia and Nicaragua — should be equally critical of the slide into authoritarian rule by the conservative president of Honduras.

Co-ed schools

Photos and interviews by David Papannah and Dreylan Johnson

This week, the man and woman in the street share their thoughts on the co-education system and whether there is a need to return to separate  educational institutions for boys and girls.

The 2020 Jubilee–and-oil Elections

Likely “socio-electoral” realities

Sexual misconduct: His Excellency is aware With maximum respect to all, I lay claim at being among the first- if not actually the first to describe National Elections 2020 as the Jubilee–Oil Elections.

Zimbabwe: a nefarious proposal

In 1972 Julius Nyerere, one of Africa’s iconoclastic leaders, stated that the African position in relation to southern Rhodesia ‘is now, as it has always been, the attainment of independence for Zimbabwe on the basis of majority rule, and under conditions which allow the development of human dignity for all citizens.’ (http://www.juliusnyerere.org/ uploads/after_the_peace_ commission_1972.pdf).