For close to seven years now reporters attached to this newspaper have gone to various communities in all ten regions of Guyana, seeking to shed light on their customs, way of life and issues. Recognising that for a very long time, many of the far-to-reach places were out of sight and in several instances out of mind as well.

Rupertee

Mist swirls around the tops of the three hills of Rupertee and the cold breeze streaming from the nearby Pakaraima Mountains, makes a memory – at least for a while – of the heat that can sear the Rupununi savannahs.

Ruimzigt

Story and photos by Dacia Whaul Ruimzigt is a small village located a few miles from Vreed-en-Hoop on the West Coast of Demerara between Windsor Forest and Wallers Delight.

Annai

Story and photos by Gaulbert Sutherland If there is any place in Guyana that should be at the top of the list of places to live, it would be Annai.

Zeeburg

By Dacia Whaul  with photos by Arian Browne “Zeeburg is the largest fishing community on the West Coast of Demerara,” boasted George, “and we have the best cricket team over here.” When most of Guyana is asleep, fisher folk in Zeeburg are coming in from the Atlantic Ocean with their catch of fish and shrimp.

Philippi

In the quiet farming community of Philippi on the Corentyne, Bertely Matheson, 70, was relaxing in a hammock in her yard when The World Beyond Georgetown dropped in.

Danielstown

Story and photos by Kenesha Fraser In the early years, according to residents, a white man named Daniel, who owned the sugar factory in the village of Sparta on the Essequibo coast, bought land in the area nearby, and the place was later called ‘Danielstown’.

De Willem

Story by Tifaine Rutherford with photos by Arian Browne I bet that you have never heard of a road called ‘Carilla Street,’ unless, that is, you are from De Willem.

Sandvoort

Stories and photos by Shabna Ullah Residents of Sandvoort, an agricultural village in West Canje, Berbice whose residents are close-knit, have been involved in self-help activities from the inception.

Anna Catherina

By Dacia Whaul with photos by Arian Browne There was no one out in the streets when Sunday Stabroek visited Anna Catherina recently.

Karaudarnau

Story and photos by Gaulbert Sutherland   If you’re scared of leaping cows, don’t go into the corral.

Dartmouth

Story and photos by Kenesha Fraser Dartmouth, a well-populated community on the Essequibo coast situated between Westbury and Perth, is an African village that was bought by freed slaves following emancipation.

Pigeon Island Squatting Area

Story by Jeanna Pearson with photos by Arian Browne   Approximately eight miles from Georgetown poverty-stricken Indian families are crammed into small dilapidated shacks along a dam near the banks of the Chateau Margot seawall.

Port Mourant

Port Mourant, Corentyne, the home village of the late president of Guyana, Dr Cheddi Jagan as well as some outstanding cricketers, was described as the only village that offers education from “nursery to university.”  It is a very large village made up of about 15 settlements including Free Yard, Bound Yard, Portuguese Quarter, Bangladesh, Ankerville, Clifton, Tain, Miss Phoebe and John’s, and it is nestled between Guyana’s smallest town of Rose Hall to the west and Bloomfield Village to the east.

Fairfield

Amidst endless cattle pastures and yellow rice fields, sits the small village of Fairfield in Mahaica.

Land of Plenty

Story and photos by Keneisha Fraser “I came to live here in 1975 when I married.

Kumu

Most people pass the scattered, thatched-roofed, mud-brick huts of Kumu without stopping and head directly to the white spray of the Kumu Falls to splash about in the cold waters roaring off the mountain.

Nigg

During a visit to Nigg, Corentyne in the scorching mid-afternoon sun, the village appears quiet and empty with hardly any activity, save for vehicles including a horse-cart with passengers, passing through.

Brickery

By Erika Williams with photos by Arian Browne   A village described by its residents as peaceful and quiet, Brickery is located on the East Bank Demerara sandwiched between Garden of Eden on the one side and Supply on the other.

Isseneru

Oh Casak! On the farms, in practically every home, at gatherings in Isseneru, this local beverage runneth over.

Lowlands

By Marcelle Thomas with photos by Arian Browne  Maybe it’s because every time it rains the village is flooded, that it got its name.

Lichfield

The friendly and helpful residents of Lichfield, West Coast Berbice are known for their independence with many of them being engaged in cattle and rice farming.

Prospect

Prospect, a small village located approximately 5 miles from Georgetown on the East Bank of Demerara, is home to nearly 800 residents.

Campbelltown

Many people do not get to watch a community grow up. Edgar Beard, who does not know his true age but is pretty sure that he is over 63 years old, however, was able to watch as the Amerindian community of Campbelltown was transformed from a community of five families to well over 300 persons today.

Perseverance

Story and photos by Tifaine Rutherford   Ask anyone about the famous silk cotton tree that is in the middle of the road at Perseverance, Mahaicony and you are sure to hear a myth or two.

Bath Settlement

Bath Settlement, West Coast Berbice, a well-populated community has seen considerable development over the years with the establishment of several large-scale businesses and a new housing scheme in one section.

Bendorff

Story and photos by Mandy Thompson Nobody seems to know that away from the hustle and bustle of the Parika Stelling tucked away behind tall trees is the small community of Bendorff.

Mahdia

By Gaulbert Sutherland Photos by Arian Browne At the RH Hotel in Mahdia, it is easy to believe that you are on a Caribbean island.

Naamless

Story and photos by Tifaine Rutherford Situated on the East Bank of Essequibo, Naamless stretches for about a ¼ of a mile and is home to approximately 150 residents of Indian and Amerindian descent.

Mon Choisi

Story and photos by Shabna Ullah No 3 Village or Mon Choisi, West Coast Berbice is quite small with a population of just over 200, but it is buzzing with economic activity and is quite popular for its large-scale honey production.

Cane Grove

The World beyond Georgetown

Story and photos by Tifaine Rutherford and Shakisa Harvey A long drive several miles behind the Mahaica market leads to this agricultural community that is located along the Mahaica River.

Hosororo

Today we bring you a visual ‘World beyond…’ The photographs are from Hosororo and Kumaka and were taken by Duncan Saul.

St Lawrence

Photos by Mandy Thompson Every village needs an Archie to cut the grass and drain water from the potholes on the roads.

Britannia

There was a lot of activity in the village of Britannia, West Coast Berbice on Saturday afternoon, with some rice farmers returning home on their tractors and other persons tending to their livestock.

Mosquito Hall

Story and photos by Tifaine Rutherford Just before one crosses the Mahaica Bridge, there is a small fishing community tucked away between the high trees and windy roads.

Nooten Zuil

Deemed one of the quietest villages on the East Coast of Demerara by residents living there, Nooten Zuil is one of those settlements which has a fruit tree in every yard, a hammock under every tree and a kitchen garden in almost every home.

Swan

Story and photos by Mandy Thompson Most people have probably never heard of Swan other than those who actually live in that general area; it is not even in Guyana’s Gazetteer.

Calcutta

The village of Calcutta, Mahaicony is made of up predominantly African Guyanese, although the name might suggest it would be occupied by East Indians.

Kingelly

Photos by Johann Earle Set on the West Coast Berbice, the village of Kingelly is one of many rustic and quiet villages along the coast.

Mon Repos

By Tifaine Rutherford with photos by Arian Browne Over the years, the first thing that comes to mind when people talk about Mon Repos, is the cheap daily market.

Lusignan

Sandwiched between Annandale and Good Hope on the East Coast of Demerara, Lusignan, is a predomi-nantly Indian Guyanese community where most residents earn their livelihood in the farming and fishing industries, and some are employed by the public and private sectors.

Strathspey

Story and photos by Mandy Thompson  He is bachelor who knows every detail about keeping a home and the various culinary skills with which a woman would be familiar.

New Hope

Photos by Arian Browne Unlike other rural villages where most people are engaged in farming, residents of the East Bank community of New Hope rarely farm and none of them has taken it up as a full-time occupation, people living in the area said.

Leonora

Story by Tifaine Rutherford with photos by Arian Browne Originally called ‘Plantation Leonora’, this village on the West Bank of Demerara got its name in colonial times.

Bengal

The World Beyond Georgetown

Bengal Village, Corentyne has started to attract notice because of Bengal Aromatic Rice which has hit the market locally and will soon reach Trinidad.

Diamond

The World Beyond Georgetown

Diamond on the East Bank of Demerara sits between Prospect and Golden Grove, and is home to one of the largest housing schemes in Guyana, if not the Caribbean.

Providence

The World Beyond Georgetown

A little community located between Herstelling and Peter’s Hall on the East Bank Demerara is developing and expanding at a rate that villagers could never have imagined some 10 years ago.

Kako

The World Beyond Georgetown

On a foggy Wednesday morning as she washed clothes in the cold, dark water of the Kako River, a woman related that she once took a young relative to the city and when it was time to bathe, the girl asked where the river was so that they take a bath.

No 10 Village West Coast Berbice

The World Beyond Georgetown

At No 10 Village, West Coast Berbice, the atmosphere was peaceful, save for the sound of vehicles slowing to access the bypass that was built to facilitate the construction of a concrete bridge.