White-tailed Deer

In the Rainforest

(Savannah Deer) Odocoileus virginianus, locally known as White-tailed or Savannah Deer, has a large range from southern Canada to northern South America; obviously they can survive in a wide variety of habitats including forest, grasslands, savannah, farming and urban areas.

Capybara

The Capybara or ‘Watrush’ as it’s known in Guyana is the largest rodent in the world. 

Ecosystems: Tropical forest

Over the past year, this feature has been showcasing some of the amazing plants and animals of the Iwokrama Rain Forest; now here are some details about the importance and role of tropical forests in general and their functions.

Vipers

The last of the well-known snake families found in Guyana is the Vipers (Viperidae).

A flower

Rain forests are rich in biodiversity and are home to many different plants and animals as well as indigenous communities.

In the Rainforest

Rain forests are rich in biodiversity and are home to many different plants and animals as well as indigenous communities.

Norantea

Iwokrama boasts over 1,500 species of flowering plants (and counting). As you travel along the Iwokrama road or walk along the trails in the forest you are likely to come across many spectacular flowers, like the Norantea.

Greenheart

(chlorocardium rodiei)

Greenheart is found only in Guyana and is one of the most important timber species.

Kabukalli (Goupia glabra)

An indicator of disturbance, the Kabukalli (Goupia glabra) tree is especially common in secondary forests and is frequent on sandy soils and old clearings.

Common Squirrel Monkey

Saimiri sciureus, the Common Squirrel Monkey is native to northern South America and can be found in French Guiana, Suriname, Guyana, Venezuela, Amazonian Brazil and Colombia.

Tiger-striped leaf frog

The Tiger-striped leaf frog (Phyllomedusa tomopterna), found in the Iwokrama Forest, Guyana,

Brazil Nut

(Bertholletia excelsa)

The Brazil nut tree is a typically Amazonian tree that prefers non-flooded forest.

Nibbi

(Heteropsis spp)

Nibbi is a hemi-epiphytic plant.  This means that they attach themselves to trees but are rooted in the ground by aerial roots.

Congo Pump

(Cecropia obtusa, Cecropia sciadophylla)

The Congo Pump is known as a pioneer or secondary species which means it is opportunistic and when large clearings are made in the forest it establishes itself and colonises.

Sandpaper tree

(Curatella americana)

This species is the most ubiquitous tree or shrub of the New World savanna biome.

Bulletwood

(Manilkara bidentata)

Bulletwood belongs to the Sapodilla plant family (Sapotaceae) and is the source of balata gum, the coagulated latex of the tree.

Crabwood (Carapa guianensis)

In the rainforest

Crabwood is a common component of season-ally inundated forests along streams and upland lateritic hills in Guyana.

Soft wallaba

(Eperua falcata)

Soft Wallaba or Wallaba is a canopy tree and seems to have a preference for extreme soil types – from very hydromorphic soils to dry soils.

Tapir

The Brazilian Lowland Tapir (Tapirus terrestris) lives only in South America. In Guyana, the tapir is also known as ‘Bush Cow‘ (the animal, not the vehicle). 

Margay

The Margay (Leoparduswiedii), like its cousin the Oncilla, is a rare and elusive small spotted cat that lives in the remote parts of the rainforest.

Labba

In the rainforest

Labba (Cuniculuspaca), Paca or Urana in Makushi – no matter the appellation, most Guyanese recognize the name of this animal and associate it with a tender, succulent meat dish!

Buff-necked Ibis

The Buff-necked Ibis (Theristicus caudatus) is a large, handsome bird which can be regularly seen in the North Rupununi savannahs, especially at Bina Hill, perched on the thatched roofs, and around the Rock View airstrip foraging in the savannah.