Roses

(Continued from last week)

There are five classes of roses: Hybrid Tea, Floribunda, Miniature, Climbers or Ramblers and Shrub roses.

The Hybrid Tea Rose is the most popular class. It is one of the best recognized among cut flowers. When used as a cut flower, the stems are long and the blooms shapely.

This hybrid is originally derived from cross pollination and is rightly regarded as the Queen of Roses.

In 1867 a chance cross between a delicate Tea Rose and a Hybrid Perpetual give rise to the first Hybrid Tea Rose – La France.  This rose is well known to keen rose growers.

A typical Hybrid Tea Rose’s blooms are medium sized to large with many petals forming a distinct central cone. The blooms are borne singly or with several buds in several colours and the fragrance is usually moderate to strong.

Some of the popular Hybrid Tea Roses that have been successfully grown in Guyana over the years are Chicago Peace, Super Star, Peace, Christian Dior, Mr Lincoln and Crimson Glory.

They can be grown as potted plants or planted into the ground and persons take pleasure in cutting these roses and decorating the home with them.

Until next week, Happy Gardening.

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Hawaiian Holly

Leea Coccinea ‘Rubra’ commonly called Hawaiian or West Indian Holly originated in Burma and comes from the Leeaceae family.

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Four o’clock flower

Marvel of Peru or Mirabilis commonly called Four O’ Clock flowers originated in Peru and is native to tropical South America.

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Agave

Agave americana, also called sentry plant, century plant, maguey or American aloe, is a species of flowering plant in the family Agavaceae and native to  Mexico and the United States in New Mexico,  Arizona and  Texas.

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Umbrella plant

Cyperus Papyrus and Cyperus Alterni-folius, commonly known as Umbrella Grass, Umbrella Plant, Umbrella Papyrus, Umbrella Sedge or the Umbrella Palm, originated in Egypt many years ago.

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Plant more trees

National Tree Planting Day was celebrated yesterday, October 7, and it was interesting to see how many new trees were planted. 

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