A little more oil in my lamp

A little more oil in my lamp to keep it burning A little more oil in my lamp I pray A little more oil in my lamp to keep it burning Keep it burning till the break of day The chorus is a snippet from a popular song that is sang in many Christian churches.

Empower you

It is not often that women come together in our society for the purpose of inspiring each other and reclaiming and rediscovering the feminine power.

Marlon

In Buxton, where I grew up, it is the custom of the Anglican Church to sound a bell to indicate the death of a person.

Do you believe in God?

In our society, there are many “judges” who are not qualified to operate in courts of law, but they are performing the roles nevertheless.

Joy, pickpockets and gluttony

A woman’s purse was snatched. Stunned, she tearfully held her head as her cash, ATM cards and ID were in the hands of a thief, who ran through the unaware crowd too fast to be apprehended and too desperate to care about the devastating effects of his actions.

Put Guyana First

Hecklers, offensive statements that go against the nature of national unity, a surprise appearance by a Santa Claus, secrets exposed around oil bonuses – haven’t the Guyanese people been betrayed enough?

Something stinks

Many of us are repulsed when we encounter people of unsound mind, who are often unwashed and smelly.

Slack and loose

Our society makes it is difficult for people to admit that they were abused because victims are often manipulated into believing that they are blameworthy.

Letter to Kescia

Dear Kescia, Your name will not be forgotten. Your relatives and friends and colleagues and the thespians will make sure of that.

Some mothers

Not every mother deserves praise or respect. The process of bringing a child into the world is not a simple task and maybe all women who commit to nine months of drastic changes to their bodies and possible health risks, such as hypertension and diabetes, should be commended for that.

On life

I saw an interesting film called ‘Flatliners’ last weekend. In it, four medical students, curious about what happens after we die, choose to stop their hearts, then to be revived to tell of their experiences.

For Leonard

Unknown to most of us before the tragic events of last week, Leonard Archibald’s face is now etched in the memories of many, indeterminately.

Spare the rod

The Convention on the Rights of the Child was adopted by the United Nations in 1989 and approved by the Government of Guyana in 1991.

Moving social cohesion beyond words

A woman of African descent wrote on social media this week, “Amerindians are animals and should go back to the bush.” The post resulted in people of all ethnicities condemning her and the condemnation in part saw her being subjected to racial slurs.

A praying nation

We often ask people, “How are you?” Though, in many cases, we don’t really care about the answer.