Mosa Telford

Mosa Telford

On life

I saw an interesting film called ‘Flatliners’ last weekend. In it, four medical students, curious about what happens after we die, choose to stop their hearts, then to be revived to tell of their experiences.

For Leonard

Unknown to most of us before the tragic events of last week, Leonard Archibald’s face is now etched in the memories of many, indeterminately.

Moving social cohesion beyond words

A woman of African descent wrote on social media this week, “Amerindians are animals and should go back to the bush.” The post resulted in people of all ethnicities condemning her and the condemnation in part saw her being subjected to racial slurs.

Legalise it

Most people who use marijuana in Guyana consume by smoking the herb. It is not only members of the Rastafarian community who engage in the practice, which is sacred to them, but people of every class, religion, ethnicity and gender.

Through the fire

As Emancipation approached this year, I found myself uninterested. It wasn’t because I had strayed from its significance or that my love and respect for the occasion had dwindled.

Hope

Hospitals are places where new life is welcomed, where healing is expected to take place and hope is restored.

Tolerance

Do most Guyanese have a problem with gay people? Or is it the sex that bothers them and more particularly the sex gay men engage in?

Somewhere in the muddle

A plot to assassinate the president? While there will always be those who disapprove of His Excellency, Brigadier (rtd) David Arthur Granger, such an allegation was disquieting.