Snake surprises Trinidad couple for Valentine’s Day

Senior Game warden Steve Seepersad removes the 4 foot Red tailed Boa commonly called macajuel snake from Robin Nagessar home in Second Branch Street Hermitage, La Romaine, yesterday.

(Trinidad Guardian) Valen­tine’s Day turned out to be a scary ex­pe­ri­ence for an el­der­ly cou­ple when they woke up to find a four-feet maca­juel in their bed­room ceil­ing yes­ter­day.

Robin Nages­sar, 73, and his wife Sum­intra, 61, re­mained out­side their home for about four hours un­til the snake was cap­tured by se­nior Game War­den Steve Seep­er­sad.

Re­call­ing the scary en­counter, Nages­sar said he got up around 3 am be­cause his wife had to go out.

“I put on my tele­vi­sion and make up my bed be­cause my wife had to go out ear­ly this morn­ing,” he said.

Senior Game warden Steve Seepersad removes the 4 foot Red tailed Boa commonly called macajuel snake from Robin Nagessar home in Second Branch Street Hermitage, La Romaine, yesterday.

Nages­sar said he saw the snake around 6.30 am when he was about to ap­ply med­ica­tion in his eyes.

“I see some­thing in the ceil­ing so I put on the oth­er light when I see the thing. I want­ed to kill it but I am a hunter so when I see it I say it is a maca­juel so no sense killing it.”

He said he did not at­tempt to cap­ture it be­cause he was too afraid.

His wife re­called, “I was wash­ing wares when my hus­band say come and see some­thing. When I gone clos­er I see some­thing big snake sit­ting down, watch­ing. I get fright­en. I stayed out of the house un­til about 12 o’clock when they move it. I was too fright­en to go back in­side.”

She sus­pect­ed that the snake crawled out of the bush­es and in­to their house dur­ing the night.

“I telling my cousin I get a snake for Valen­tine’s,” she chuck­led.

Their daugh­ter, who lives near­by with her hus­band, called the Fire Ser­vice which then con­tact­ed the game war­den.

Seep­er­sad said he found the two-year-old maca­juel, a red tail boa, in the ceil­ing be­tween the gal­vanise and rafter. He de­scribed the snake as a ba­by as it usu­al­ly grows to about 12 feet long.

“It is def­i­nite­ly non-ven­omous. If it were to bite you, it would bite you as if you got a bite from a dog,” Seep­er­sad said.

Seep­er­sad sus­pect that the snake sought refuge in the cou­ple’s home from the bush fires. He said the snake is pro­tect­ed and any­one who kills it could face a fine of $10,000. He not­ed that the fine was in­creased from $200 to $10,000 as of Jan­u­ary 1.

With lep­tospiro­sis ram­pant in the coun­try, he said a non-ven­omous snake might be a good an­i­mal to have around the house since it eats rats and oth­er small an­i­mals.

How­ev­er, he cau­tioned against peo­ple try­ing to cap­ture or kill the snake.

“The gen­er­al pho­bia in Trinidad or in the world is if some­one sees a snake is to kill it, that is wrong. So if you afraid of snake the best thing to do is call the au­thor­i­ties and let them deal with it.”

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