Diamond man remanded for attempted murder

Akeem Lammy

“I want dead! Yal gah kill me!” were the yells of an out of control labourer moments after he was remanded to prison for the attempted murder of a man, who remains hospitalised in a critical condition.

Akeem Lammy, 21, of Lot 685 Section B’ Block X’ Great Diamond, was read the attempted murder charge in the courtroom of Chief Magistrate Ann McLennan.

The charge stated that Lammy, on June 10, at Norton Street, Werk-en-Rust, unlawfully and maliciously wounded Johnny Ramadeen.

Lammy was not required to plead to the indictable charge.

Police Prosecutor Gordon Mansfield then told the court that the defendant and the accused, who are known to each other, had an argument, due to a misunderstanding. As a result of the argument Lammy, according to the prosecutor, picked up a piece of wood and lashed Ramadeen on his head. The complainant was subsequently admitted to the Georgetown Public Hospital with a suspected fractured skull.

Chief Magistrate Ann McLennan then remanded the accused to prison, ordering him to receive counselling from a probation officer until the completion of the Preliminary Inquiry. Lammy was then remanded to prison and the matter adjourned to June 25. Subsequent to being remanded to prison, the court’s orderly proceeded to unlock one of the handcuffs from Lammy’s hand to place it behind his back, at which point in time the accused began to behave in a hysterical manner, yelling and pushing the officer.

In the midst of the pushing and kicking, Lammy butted the orderly, and other officers were summoned to control him, as he yelled, “I want yal kill me!! I tired suffering, I been suffering long.”

A family member rushed into the docks in an apparent effort to calm down the raging man, while others began to cry and also attempted to help calm him down, but they were escorted out of the courtroom by police ranks.

With much sustained efforts by the police ranks, Lammy, whose rage was beyond control, was finally placed in new handcuffs, taken down the court chute and escorted into the court lockups, where his ranting and rage continued before he later calmed down.