So It Go

Silent despair

To be living in Guyana and coping with the daily dysfunctions in this and that, is to notice that while we are aware of the various big projects needing attention, the creeping feeling of despair rather comes from the small malfunctions that seem to confront us – some of them going on for years – on a daily basis.

Start to look at your self

This past week, even as we mourn the loss of calypsonians Lord Canary here, and of King Austin in Trinidad, the subject of calypso as an art form is again getting traction with comments by Trinidad & Tobago President Anthony Carmona delivering the feature address at the Top 20 Stars of Gold Show presented by the country’s National Action Cultural Committee (NACC).

Standup comedy

I came into music at a time when comedy was a big ingredient in the popular music of the Caribbean. It was a salient feature in calypso, particularly in the array of comical songs featuring every year in Trinidad’s carnival, continuing that history of clever humour that came from the artistry of Atilla, Beginner, Spoiler, Roaring Lion, etc.

Jamaica shines

This week as the world is agog with the outstanding track performances by Jamaican athletes in the Rio Olympics, it’s interesting to reflect on the remarkable ability of this relatively small nation to produce such a high standard in athletics.

The bumps of life on the road

Most people I meet have this impression that the life of a travelling musician – as we say, “on the road” – is one big joyful experience, seeing new cities and countries, playing before ecstatic crowds, doing well financially, meeting famous people, after hours parties, nuff woman and food and drink, as well as the harder stuff, with the pattern repeated more or less every day, on and on.

Nothing to do with cricket

Patrons of the current T20 matches in the CPL, whether at the stadiums or via television, are witnessing a non-stop array of diversions – carnival outfits; steelband music; scantily clad dancers; one-handed catches by spectators; individual mask contests; etc – that mostly begin before the first ball has been bowled and often continue long after. 

We must embrace all of Guyana

In a recent column I made a passing reference to a comment from Stabroek News writer Alan Fenty who had posed the question in his column whether “one could be Guyanese – spiritually and culturally – without being Indian, African, European or Chinese?” I answered Alan at the time saying the answer is “no, because we are made up of all these strands from other places, plus the Amerindian one, so to be truly Guyanese you have to see all those strands as part of you.”  However, I felt at the time that his comment called for more elaboration, hence my effort today.

Moving from what to how

I keep jottings of various things I come across in communications with persons or in various readings or observations.  It’s a practice from years ago, purely as a reminder of ideas, starting in my days in Canada, and it’s often fascinating to go back to those scribblings and to be vividly struck by what was in front of me then compared to now.

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