Euthanasia: The last undertaking

Last week we dealt with the activity associated with actually putting the pet to sleep permanently, usually using the method of lethal injection (overdose of an anaesthetic, which works quickly and smoothly).

Euthanasia

Continued   Last week, I referred to the ‘Frequently Asked Ques-tions (FAQ)’ relative to the actual putting-to-sleep pro-cess.

Euthanasia

Continued When pet owners come to the conclusion that it is best for their pets to be put to sleep permanently, very often they want to know how their beloved pets are going to be euthanised and what should they do with the dead body after the procedure.

Euthanasia

(Continued) You remember that last week we began looking at quantifiable and measurable criteria that would assist the caring pet owner in making a well-considered decision on the question of putting the beloved pet to sleep.

Euthanasia

(Continued from last week) Last week, I advised that you involve your veterinarian in that debate as to whether to put the pet to sleep permanently, or to try to keep it alive as long as possible, in spite of the agony being experienced by all.

Euthanasia

(Continued)   We spent some time the week before last debunking the spurious reasons some people give for opting to kill their pets.

Euthanasia

Continued from last week We will continue today analyzing the questionable arguments that develop when a person wants to self-justify reasons for killing his/her pet.

Euthanasia

Continued   The topic of euthanasia is assuredly accompanied by heartache. Yet it has to be discussed, because sooner or later many pet owners/caregivers have to confront this eventuality.

Euthanasia

Continued from last week Physicians who are deeply committed to the Hippocratic Oath must experience great agony when their patients are terminally ill, and they (the doctors) can do nothing treatment-wise to save them.

Surface tumours

Conclusion   Venereal tumours You may recall that last week a passing reference was made to ‘transmissible canine venereal tumours’ (TCVT) as a vaginal condition which could be mistaken for the proliferation of cells which accompanies another ailment, viz vaginal hyperplasia.

Surface tumours/cancers

(Continued from last week) Vaginal tumours Today and next week, we’ll address two types of tumours affecting the canine vagina, which are similar, yet distinct, relative to their origins/causes and the way they exhibit themselves.

Surface tumours

Continued from last week In last week’s column, in my haste to conclude the painful and distressing topic of tumours/cancers, I omitted mentioning two of the most frequent ailments in our tumour/cancer discussions, namely those associated with the vagina and the breast.

Surface tumours

Continued from last week Haematomas/Seromas I had promised last week (and the week before) to deal with ear haematomas.

The haemangiosarcoma

Last week, after discussing the benign haemangiomas (HAS), I promised to continue with haematomas – all within the context of the surface tumours theme.

Skin tumours

Continued from last week   As was promised last week, we will deal with a condition known as ‘Hygroma’ or, as some scientists refer to it, a ‘False bursa’ or ‘bursitis.’   Before we commence with the Hygroma/bursitis, I should mention a condition that is closely related to and possibly a precursor of the Hygroma problem.